The End of Something

My career as a full-time teacher is drawing to a close, and I’m having some trouble getting used to the idea.

Several weeks ago, I decided to take advantage of an early retirement program at my college, so I will be leaving at the end of this semester. Of course, I’m really excited about the prospect of having free time to read whatever I want, in whatever order I want to read it; to focus on my writing, music and knitting; and, most of all, to do a bit of traveling. Teaching, as I told one of my colleagues, was getting in the way of my own learning, and so I’m grateful to be able to step back from a career that, despite its frustrations, has been a central and valued part of my life. I have learned more about teaching in the dozen or so years I’ve spent at this small community college in rural Northern Michigan than I ever thought possible, which is part of the reason I have mixed feelings about leaving.

In some ways, I feel I’m at the top of my game as a teacher. I don’t have to take a lot of time to prepare for each class, and most classroom situations don’t really throw me. (Of course, there are a few that were pretty funny, and, once I retire, I look forward to sharing these stories, like the one about the time a speech student tried to bring a goat to class.) Grading papers, of course, is still a tremendous burden, and like most writing instructors, I greatly resent it. But it turns out that grading is not as heavy a burden for me as the human burden. By this, I mean that I try to see each of my students as an individual; everyone, I told myself as I began my teaching career, is someone’s child. I asked myself, how would I want my child treated by their professors? The answer was clear.  So I have always tried to be open, inviting, and encouraging with my students, and it’s made for some great moments as a teacher. But it’s also made it possible for me to see the real pain in my students’ lives. From the student who schleps her infant to class, no matter subzero temperatures, to the student whose grip on religion is ironclad because he’s found no other outlet or support, to the student who suffers from a laundry list of health problems as a result of serving in Afghanistan–each of these students has a claim on me, because I have always felt it’s more important to be a human being first and a professor second.

It’s a noble idea, but now, as I move towards my last days of teaching (at least full-time), I can see its flaws. In essence, teaching as a human being is like “hearing the grass grow and the squirrel’s heartbeat,” in the famous words of George Eliot in Middlemarch (Chapter 20), whose narrator predicts that those who can attend to such emotional minutiae are likely to “die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence.” I am not in danger of dying from being exposed to that roar, but I am pained by my work these days. I’m stricken by the sadness of seeing the eccentric student who has no friends, sitting alone in the cafeteria; I’m depressed by the difficulties facing young mothers and fathers as they try to gain an education to make life better for their children; and I’m overwhelmed by the challenges, and, yes, the tragedies, that lie behind the eyes of many of my students who stare up at me as I try to dish out some wisdom to help them in their journey through life.

It’s a tough job, and I’ve given it what I could over the years. One consolation I’ve always had, however, is that if I do a poor job one semester, I could always improve the next time around. This semester is different, though. There is no next time. Does that mean I’ll finally get it right and teach well this term? The answer has become clear over the past few weeks. This semester will be like all the other semesters I’ve had: some successes in the classroom, but many more failures. I’m satisfied that I’ve made the right decision, though. It’s time for someone else to step up and try their hand at this job. I’m ready to take my ball and go home, even if that means that I leave a career I love.

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under career, Careers, Education, Teaching, Teaching, Writing

5 responses to “The End of Something

  1. Val Meyerson

    WOW- big news for you Suzanne. I can only imagine how difficult the decision was for you. I’m a bit sad for the upcoming students who will not get to experience your amazing grace as a professor. Thank you for all you’ve done for the students. Have fun! Can’t wait to hear about your adventures.

    Like

  2. Cyndy

    And yet…I bet you have made a difference in the life of each and every one of your students.

    Like

  3. Kate

    Just make sure you’re planning a trip to Italy somewhere between all that reading and knitting!

    Like

  4. As it says in the Mishna, He who saves a life, it is as if he saved an entire world. When you find yourself feeling a bit down about leaving full-time teaching, just pause for a minute and think of the worlds you have saved. To each student you inspired in such a manner as to change his or her life, it is as if you had saved that life, and so, a world.
    In other words, ya done good, kid. Enjoy your (semi-)retirement!

    Like

  5. Chris H.

    Suzanne – all progress is incremental. It’s just easier to see big leaps instead of many small steps. You have made a difference in the lives of more students than you know. You and I both know of the countless students who have come to your office to consult on literature or on life. But perhaps you did not notice, as I did, the students who were not in your classes but who saw your office as a place of ideas and enthusiasms. They were in the hallways as you were talking about Tolkien, Shakespeare, Hemingway, and even C.S. Lewis. You opened doors and hearts and minds. Kudos on a job well done and best wishes for many grand adventures ahead!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s